2GR-FE: Everything You Need to Know | Specs and More

Toyota introduced the GR engine family in 2005 as a replacement for the outdated MZ, JZ, and VZ engines. Just like the engines, it replaced it used a 6-cylinder design and has been proven to be a very reliable engine. The 2GR-FE doesn’t have the same cult following as the 1UZ or 2JZ, but it’s still a very good little engine.

2GR-FE: Engine Basics and Specs

The 2GR-FE uses an open deck V6 design with an aluminum cylinder block and aluminum cylinder heads. This all aluminum helped save weight which increases fuel economy. Toyota used a DOHC design with the 2GR-FE along with 4-valves per cylinder to improve power and further improve efficiency.

This engine also features advanced technologies such as; forged steel connecting rods, cast aluminum lower intake manifold, and Toyota’s Dual VVT-i system. That dual VVT-i system really helps increase power and torque while still maintaining good efficiency. The 2GR’s open deck helps improve the cooling system’s efficiency.

Later versions of this engine used Toyota’s direct injection system which improved power and efficiency even further.

  • Production Run: 2005 – Current
  • Cylinder Block Material: Aluminum
  • Cylinder Head Material: Aluminum
  • Valvetrain: Dual Over Head Cams – Four-Valve per Cylinder
  • Stroke: 83mm
  • Bore: 94mm
  • Compression Ratio: 10.8:1, 11.8:1, 12.5:1, 13:1
  • Horsepower: 268hp to 296hp
  • Torque: 248 lb-ft to 260 lb-ft

Cars That Came With The 2GR-FE

Just like pretty much every other Toyota engine, the 2GR has been used in lots of different vehicles over the year. Why develop an entirely new engine when you can just adapt the current one for different models. Lotus even used this engine in their Evora S model which output 345 horsepower thanks to its supercharger.

  • 2004 – present: Toyota Avalon
  • 2006 – 2012: Toyota Aurion
  • 2005 – 2012: Toyota RAV4
  • 2006 – present: Toyota Estima
  • 2006 – present: Toyota Camry
  • 2006 – present: Lexus ES 350
  • 2007 – 2015: Lexus RX 350
  • 2007 – 2016: Toyota Highlander
  • 2007 – 2012: Toyota Blade
  • 2007 – 2013: Toyota Mark X Zio
  • 2008 – present: Toyota Alphrad
  • 2008 – 2016: Toyota Venza
  • 2009 – 2016: Toyota Sienna
  • 2009 – present: Lotus Evora
  • 2011 – present: Lotus Evora S
  • 2012: Lotus Exige S

2GR-FE: Known Problems

Lots of Toyota engines in the past were known for excessive oil consumption such as the 2AZ-FE engine. This issue was typically caused by the piston rings and is a pretty expensive repair. Luckily, the 2GR-FE doesn’t seem to be affected by this common Toyota issue.

After some research, the only real problem we could find that was consistent across multiple 2GR engines is the idler pulley. When this pulley starts to go bad it can cause belt squeak or load rattling noises. Toyota has a heavy duty version of this component available and many owners just upgrade to that part to fix the issue.

2GR-FE: Tuning Potential

With Honda engines, most people will go for a naturally aspirated build. The trend with Toyota engines seems to be centrifugal superchargers, and the 2GR-FE is no different. After some research, it appears most 2GR-FE owners agree that a supercharger is the best bang for buck way to get power out of the engine.

The most popular kit is the TRD kit if you can find it. A ROTREX supercharger kit is also very common and pretty easy to install. A supercharger running around 6psi of boost will increase horsepower by 40 and torque is increased by 40 lb-ft. That’s with stock everything other than the supercharger. With a full exhaust and some other mods, you can imagine just how much power the little 2GR-FE can make.

2GR-FSE

The FSE variant of the 2GR brings some nifty advancements which increase power and efficiency. The biggest upgrade for this engine is Toyota’s D4S twin fuel injection system. This system combines direct injection with the standard port injection which ford is also doing on their latest EcoBoost engines.

With the addition of this twin fuel injection system power is increased to 305 horsepower. That may not sound like a huge amount but you must remember this is a naturally aspirated 3.5L engine. Kia’s new stinger GT only achieve 350 horsepower with a twin turbo V6, so achieving 305 horsepower without turbos is pretty darn impressive.

When combined with a supercharger power is bumped up to 355 horsepower, and with some modifications can be over 400 horsepower. Not bad for a Toyota V6!

2GR-FXE

Just like the 2AZ-FXE, the 2GR-FEX uses an Atkinson cycle design. This works by effectively reducing the compression stroke and leaving the exhaust stroke as it was. This improves efficiency by a massive amount without introducing any unnecessary complexity.

This engine also uses VVT-i like the other 2GR variants, but also adds an EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) cooler. By cooling the EGR system Toyota was able to increase the compression ratio all the way up to 13:1 without having to worry about the exhaust gases becoming excessively hot. The highest power achieved by this 2GR variant is 292 horsepower in the Lexus GS 450h.

If you’re still craving more information on the 2GR engine check out the Wikipedia Toyota GR page!

About Bryce Cleveland 249 Articles

Bryce founded Dust Runners Automotive Journal in 2014 as a way to write about the cars he found interesting. When he’s not writing for Dust Runners he’s writing for Power Automedia as a freelancer. He currently drives a 2015 Fiesta ST and absolutely loves it.

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